Sunday, December 18, 2016

2016 Lessons Learned from 7 Associations


People often ask me, “What does SCD Group do?”

As I look back on 2016, a recap might help while offering lessons for other associations and nonprofits.


STRATEGIC PLANNING 

Using the strategic intent planning model, I guided five (5) national nonprofits in envisioning their futures and/or reviewing their existing strategic plans. In each assignment, I began with a survey of planning participants, association leaders and/or a random sample of members. The survey data helps me plan the planning as well as provide association leaders insight into their organization. The associations I worked with included:

As part of their strategic intent, three of the associations decided they needed to pursue changing the organization’s name as their changing profession made the current name somewhat “obsolete.”

Sunday, December 11, 2016

Change Created Chaos Impacts Associations


Change is all around. Some respond better than others. Association boards and association executives have the Duty of Foresight. That means a duty to the organization to monitor trends and adjust association strategies to fit the changes.

A recent trip through the Kansas City airport highlights three changes that illustrate how – without modification – change creates chaos.

Airport Security

Arriving/departing the KC airport (MCI) is a stark reminder how change creates chaos.

MCI was perfectly designed with three “semi-circle shaped” hubs that provided easy access from parking and gates. No long terminal hallways.

Then massive changes resulted from hijackers and terrorists that resulted in new security processes and TSA screeners.

Sunday, October 30, 2016

6 Things that Go Boo in the Night for Association Execs


Okay, it’s Halloween and time to think about scary topics.

Here are six things that can spook association executives.
  1. A key employs embezzles association funds.  Always my biggest fear ... both as an association exec and as an AMC owner. And, despite warnings, we’re seeing far too much embezzlement in associations and nonprofits. We saw another case “pop up” here in Southwest Florida. What are boards thinking? Too many boards don’t seem to care about policies or procedures. Trust but verify! When I owned an AMC, I contracted with a certified fraud examiner to establish financial systems (yes, checks and balances) to reassure myself and our clients that their funds were safe and well managed?
  2. A volunteer president dies in office.   It happens. At one association I managed, one of our executive committee members died unexpectedly. Another’s president died soon after being elected. Do you think ahead and build contingency plans? Do you include this in a crisis communications plan? How do you inform your boards? Your staff? Plan ahead now and hope you never need it!
  3. A competing association starts in your space.   It has happened in several professions/industries. It could be organized as a for-profit company! It often begins when a company starts a conference or trade show that leads to an organization. It could start from a website or blog. An example is the Veterinary Information Network which calls itself “the oldest and largest online medical information service devoted to veterinary medicine.” Well, what happened to the American Veterinary Medicine Association and its role? It could happen to you so be prepared, scan your environment so you are not surprised.
  4. You get hacked or a natural disaster hits.    In the “good old days,” we only needed to worry about a power surge knocking out the phone system and computer network. Now, hacking data is prevalent. Are you prepared with backup systems if you get hacked? What if the hacker gets personal data of your members? Or, instead of hacking, perhaps a tornado, hurricane, earthquake or zika virus (or other epidemic) hits an area where you are scheduled to hold your big annual conference? Are you prepared? Do you have proper insurance conference? Does your crisis communications plan include contacting your attendees and/or members?
  5. A key employ leaves with minimal notice or death.  My chief financial officer gave us two weeks notice. Shock waves. Losing a key position. An AMC owner once shared that a key executive died in an accident on the way to an association meeting. Tragic. Do you have contingency plans? I used to keep a resume file for staff prospects. I networked a lot to develop a talent pool to draw on. In the case of the CFO, I reached out to our outside CPAs and attorneys to seek candidates and to help “vet” prospects. What are you doing?
  6. Your biggest member resigns.   This applies mostly to trade associations where companies – not individuals – belong to the association. Almost all trade associations are composed of a diverse membership. I’ve seen somewhere the “big guys” say the association is run by the “little guys” and vice versa! Sometimes, one of the larger members doesn’t like the policy direction the organization has taken and threatens to cancel its membership (which might be 20% to 25% of the total revenue). My AMC managed a trade association where two of its members convinced the board to dissolve the association and become a “council” of a much larger (and more expensive association. Since that move, several of the members have resigned from the new council and are talking about re-forming the former association. Association execs need to be prepared. You need to recognize that “all members are equal but some are likely to be more equal than others!”
Hopefully, you will never face any of these spooky situations. But, hope doesn’t always work. Prior thought does. Contingency planning does. Being prepared does. If you’ve done all that, you should sleep better and not have to worry about things that go boo in the night!

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Retiring Soon? When do you tell your association board?



If retirement is on your horizon, when do you inform your association’s board of directors.

Since Boomers represent a vast number of association CEOs, this is a major issue facing associations and nonprofits.

I've been on all sides of this issue:  as a volunteer when a CEO left; as a CEO who left; as a retiring Association Management Company (AMC) owner and most recently as a search consultant who helped a small, national association find a new executive team.

Recently, an association CEO raised the timing and transition question on ASAE’s Collaborate.  She began by telling us that she notified her board that she would be retiring in June 2019.  Thus a three-year notice.

What do you think?  Are you nearing retirement?  When do you plan to inform your board and staff?

Here are 5 suggestions for anyone looking at "giving notice" to retire:

Sunday, August 7, 2016

Recognition Drives Stronger Member Relationships



At one association where I worked, we “hung” photos of all the past presidents on a hallway wall.

No big deal, right?

Well, perhaps this recognition of service was more meaningful than I realized.

While at Ohio State, I had the opportunity to be part of the initial varsity ice hockey team. While I was a marginal player, I played every game for three years. Then, upon leaving Columbus, I disappeared and only occasionally had contact with the hockey program and former players; mainly at the 25th and 50th reunions.

Then, a Facebook post last week gave me a thrill that few get.

Ohio State created a “tradition wall” in the hockey locker room. They put a “brick” for every person that ever played hockey at Ohio State. And, there, on the bottom row, was my brick – with my name on it. There among all the other OSU players. Wow! (You can see it in the photo above ... just about the “N” in Tradition.

This tradition created a latent, awesome feeling that I didn’t know was in me.

And, now, I realize how important it is for associations to recognize their members (and donors). A plaque. A brick in the sidewalk. A photo on the wall. Perhaps a “symbolic brick” on your association’s website?
It doesn’t cost you much but the rewards to you are priceless!